What to Write

Chartridge (3)Learning CentreLorettoBradenham Ramp

So……what form could your writing take ?

We want you to use the Aylesbury Estate as your creative influence, and as long as what you enter for the competition, is UNDER 1000 words you can chose your style here are some ideas. Poetry and fiction and creative non-fiction are eligible, with forms including flash fiction, micro-fiction, and Twitter fiction, or Tweet poetry (140 characters, or about 23 words, including our address @severalstoreys)

 

Flash fiction/Micro Fiction – These are short, short stories of up to 1,000 words

The Drabble – 100 words

Nanofiction – 55 words

Twitter fiction or Twitterature – 140 characters, or about 23 words

Your poems can be Sonnets, Limericks, Haikus, Ballads, Elegies, Odes, Rondeaus, Dramatic Monologues or anything else you fancy, but remember to stick to the word limit of up to 1,000 words.

If you want to find out more about poetic styles here are some useful websites

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/collection/poetic-forms

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poetry

http://www.poemofquotes.com/articles/poetry_forms.php

We have left some reference books in the Creation Office, so please pop in to borrow some books if you need some inspiration.

Here is a quick guide about short story writing

http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Short-Story

Collect ideas for your story – carry a notepad with you or make notes on your phone. Inspiration can come from things you see, snippets of conversations you hear or even how places make you feel.

Once you have your idea a good short story should have these elements

    • Introduction: This sets the scene so introduce your characters, setting, time, etc.
    • Initiating action: the point of a story that starts the rising action.
    • Rising action: events leading up to the climax or turning point.
    • Climax: the most intense point or turning point of the story.
    • Falling action: your story begins to conclude.
    • Resolution: a satisfying ending to the story in which the central conflict is resolved—or not!

You typically won’t be able to develop more than one plot, two or three main characters, and one setting in a short story & sometimes it is easier to work from your resolution backwards !  So fire up your lap top or pick up that pen what are you waiting for ?

We will be sharing our commissioned works over the coming weeks so be sure to check back and see what other people are writing. Here is our first story by Alex Burrett: http://www.severalstoreys.co.uk/bending-the-long-spoon-by-alex-burrett/